Taking A Cut Out of Life is a traveling panel discussion designed to transcend generations by

sharing the common experiences of African American males. African American leaders discuss the issues of the community while sharing key strategies for moving toward a common

ground through focused leadership in our homes and communities. The forum concludes with

Q&A and a call to action.

50th Anniversary of the Assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

Atlanta, April 4, 2018 - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. made the ultimate sacrifice fifty years ago today and on this day of remembrance, Americans and the world pause with respect and gratitude. As his children celebrate his life and dedication to freedom and equality for all, this nation must never forget or take for granted the sacrifice he made in both death and life, to raise the moral consciousness of America. The Jim Crow era of segregation, discrimination and domestic terrorism against African Americans, which was acceptable and legal, was not acceptable to Dr. King. As the United States judged and condemned many nations for atrocities against mankind, the same acts against their black citizens were prevailing and woven into the DNA of our nation. Dr. King and all the participants of the Nonviolent Movement, forced this nation to look at itself in a mirror, while the world watched and held a collective breath.
 
On this day, the 50th anniversary of Dr. King's assassination, 100 Black Men of America, Inc. and the members across our global network encourage the world’s citizens to remember Dr. King’s courage in the face of injustice along with his unwavering fight for the dignity and civil rights for Americans of color and for citizens of the world. “As we paused yesterday to reflect on the anniversary and words in his I Have a Dream speech, we are reminded of the prophetic and fearless mindset Dr. King had assumed 50 years ago,” stated Thomas W. Dortch, Jr. Chairman, 100 Black Men of America, Inc. “Today on the anniversary of King’s ultimate sacrifice, we ask the youth we mentor, American citizens and the people of the world, to pause and imagine the advances we could make if we moved forward the work he began vs. moving backwards.”
 
Where do we go from here? Dr. King dreamed of complete equality in America for people of color. He dreamed of a country that judged character and where freedom allowed you to pursue life and experience liberties that are covered within its constitution. He never gave up and never turned back. “As an organization focused on mentoring and educating youth, while empowering the communities in which they live, we will continue to work collectively with others to move our nation forward,” stated Dortch.
 
100 members, mentees, staff and stakeholders are asked to observe a moment of silence and reflection for 39 seconds (Dr. King’s age at the time of his assassination). Please do so at 6:05 pm local time, as bells ring out in your area and across the world. 
 
About 100 Black Men of America, Inc.
 
The overall concept of The 100 began in 1963 in New York City when a group of concerned African American men began to meet to explore ways of improving conditions in their community. These visionaries included businessmen and industry leaders such as David Dinkins, Robert Mangum, Dr. William Hayling, Nathaniel Goldston III, Livingston Wingate Andrew Hatcher, and Jackie Robinson. Since inception, the vision has materialized to be shared by more than 10,000 members reaching over 125,000 underserved, underrepresented minority youth annually. Our motto, “What They See Is What They’ll Be,” very succinctly expresses how our programmatic services rendered to disadvantaged, disenfranchised and low-income youth and families positively change their life trajectory.

100 Black Men of America, Inc. Responds to the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Shooting

 

ATLANTA, FEBRUARY 16, 2018 - 100 Black Men of America, Inc. are once again broken hearted about the loss of young people who will never again return home. Our prayers are with the families whose lives are forever changed. Every elected official, including the President must do something different. Every American citizen must take action and contact their representatives in Washington, demanding a change in the laws.
 
“If we want to stop the slaughtering of children and educators in our schools, removing the politics and doing the work to put legislation in place should be a priority today,” stated Thomas W. Dortch, Jr., Chairman, 100 Black Men of America, Inc. In week six of 2018, February 14, 2018 marked the 18th school shooting in America. Why does this keep happening in the United States and not in other countries?
 
  • Easy access to high-powered weapons does not exist in other civilized nations.
  • The policy response to mass shooting over the years has resulted in relaxed gun laws.
  • Universal background checks and reasonable restrictions, including banning assault weapons.
  • Loosening of gun laws at state levels across the United States.
 
New laws will not stop all violence, but America should do everything possible to minimize the harm to children. Laws should also be created that require online social media outlets to monitor and report to law enforcement when posts should be investigated. The right to bear arms should never outweigh the right of every young person and educator not to be murdered while at school. 
 
How U.S. gun deaths compare to other countries - CBS News
About 100 Black Men of America, Inc.
 
The overall concept of The 100 began in 1963 in New York City when a group of concerned African American men began to meet to explore ways of improving conditions in their community. These visionaries included businessmen and industry leaders such as David Dinkins, Robert Mangum, Dr. William Hayling, Nathaniel Goldston III, Livingston Wingate Andrew Hatcher, and Jackie Robinson. Since inception, the vision has materialized to be shared by more than 10,000 members reaching over 125,000 underserved, underrepresented minority youth annually. Our motto, “What They See Is What They’ll Be,” very succinctly expresses how our programmatic services rendered to disadvantaged, disenfranchised and low-income youth and families positively change their life trajectory.

100 Black Men of Greater Dallas/Ft. Worth Inc. Teaches Urban Teens The “Competitive Edge - Branded for Success” During National Mentoring Month

Dallas – January 26, 2018. It was an ordinary Saturday, but if you asked the group of young men seated around the large U-shaped table in the conference room at the American Red Cross building, they would say, it’s a bit different. The teens, ranging in ages from 7 – 12th grade, are part of the Saturday Leadership Program of the 100 Black Men of Greater/Dallas Ft. Worth Inc., and they are here to learn the first steps of branding themselves.
CHAIRMAN'S MEMORANDUM
 
TO: U.S. Congress
 
100 Black Men of America, Inc. Executive Board
100 Black Men Chapters
National Black Organizations and Nonprofits
U.S. Media Outlets
FROM: Thomas W. Dortch, Jr. (Chairman of the Board)
The World is Watching
The World is Watching is an understatement because the whole world is watching America more closely than ever before. When it comes to words and actions, America has always been at the center of our global stage. During this climate of continuous racist, divisive and disrespectful tweets, comments and actions of President Trump, unfortunately, too many people believe the world’s focus is on the President, when in fact the world is watching to see how American citizens act and respond.
 
A very simple question has repeatedly been asked of Americans to which many have tried to spin, deflect and redirect. The simple question is...Do you believe that El Salvador, Haiti and Africa (which is a continent) are “shithole countries?”
 
It’s a “yes” or “no” question! The world is watching how those in Congress answer this question. The world is wondering why others in leadership positions are not speaking out. History will ask why religious leaders and the church community did not respond. The audacity of Americans, especially those in Congress and other leadership positions, to try to answer in any other way than a direct NO is not only insulting and inflammatory but brings to light the more serious concerns.
 
Time and time again we have all witnessed the ignorant tweets, quotes and comments being made by this President, even from the White House, with support from elected officials and staff whose salaries are paid by the citizens being insulted. From “Mexicans are rapists,” to “When you’re a star, they let you do it,” to the infamous “Grab her by the p****,” to calling NFL players protesting injustice “Sons of bitches,” to “All Haitians have AIDS,” to “African immigrants should go back to their huts.” 
 
As we dawn the anniversary of celebrating the life and achievements of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., I would like to remind Americans of two quotes from Dr. King, (1) Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity, and (2) The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.
 
The world is watching and each time Americans who espouse themselves to be well- educated, consider themselves of good character and believe themselves to be religious or faith conscientious choose to spin, deflect or redirect on such grave issues, they undermine each of these characteristics and send a resounding message of what America (we the people) represent and stand for.
 
Moving beyond the direct racism and related undertones of racism that will ultimately materialize through policy, Americans should be further appalled at the vulgarity of speech and the condoning of violence by our leadership. Growing up, like many of you, I was often reminded that I represent more than just myself. There simply should never be a time when Americans find it acceptable for the President of the United States of America, Congress or any other leader of our country to reference another country as a “shithole.” The world is watching; and I would remind us all that what you display and demonstrate as acceptable is setting the tone for every other American, especially the youth of our nation.
 
The damage being done internal to our country and external of our borders is astounding and everyone who tries to spin, defend or deflect the ignorance and racism should consider the words of Benjamin Franklin, Justice will not be served until those who are unaffected are as outraged as those who are. Far too long America, has portrayed black and brown people as unintelligent, unable to learn, less than human, animals, living in despair and squalor and the countries from which they come as desolate, barren, heathen and undeveloped. Are you aware that 43% of African immigrants have college degrees and 25% of Nigerian Americans hold graduate degrees? Have you seen the City of San Miguel in El Salvador or traveled to Cameroon or Mozambique in Africa? Have you researched the inventions that you use every day that were developed by people of color?

All Americans have lineage to countries outside the United States. If you revisit history, your family ancestry probably includes immigrants and countries that were once the object of such vile disrespect. As you reflect on that, also take a moment to stop and ask yourself, Do I truly believe that El Salvador, Haiti and Africa (which is a continent) are “shitholes” countries? If you are unable to directly answer an unequivocal NO, then you should do more research. More importantly, if your answer is an unequivocal NO, then you should let your outrage be known and your voice heard that this continued misrepresentation, fictitious and divisive actions must cease. Call your U.S. Senator and Congressional Representative and unequivocally let them know that you expect them to stand up, challenge these disparaging comments, speak truth to power and loudly speak out against this ignorance! 

OUR RESPONSE TO THE UNJUSTLY SHOOTING OF JORDAN EDWARDS

As we learn more details about the tragic and senseless shooting of Jordan Edwards, a young student athlete, attending a party in Balch Springs, TX, one glaring reality stares us in the face. This death, this killing of a young man that was so alive with promise was avoidable. We, and other communities across all racial divides, mourn along with this mother and father, yet we clearly see that this simply did not have to happen.

STATEMENT FROM 100 BLACK MEN OF GREATER DALLAS/FORT WORTH, INC.

(Dallas, Texas) - The 100 Black Men of Greater Dallas extends its deepest condolences to the families of the slain officers and those officers that were injured.  Each is in our thoughts and prayers.

The Dallas 100 hosts, “Mobilizing the Village”

Hosting Dr. Steve Perry insight on increasing student performance by adjusting the approach to education is invaluable and proven in multiple major metropolitan urban communities across the country, with 100% of the students from his Capital Prep schools going on to 4‐year colleges and universities, despite often having started off at an academic deficit with regards to perceived instructional readiness.
  • White Instagram Icon

© Copyright 2017 by 100 Black Men of Greater Dallas/ Ft. Worth.

Tel: 817-465-6755

Email: info@100bmgdfw.org

Contact Us

Address

P.O. BOX 226081

Dallas, TX 75222-6081